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    There are so many social media apps, and new ones are popping up all the time. We’ve put together a list of the most common apps your children may be using, and, with some help from Common Sense Media, we’re letting you know about some of the dangers these app pose. We’ll be updating this list with more apps when we learn about potential problems you need to know about.
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      Facebook - a way for people to connect with friends and colleagues
      Twitter - allows users to post brief messages and follow other users
      Snapchat - pictures and videos disappear after being viewed
      Instagram - users can share photos and 15-second videos
      Vine - Vine lets users post and watch looping six-second video clips
      Calculator% - allows users to hide photos and videos

    Why it's popular: This app allows users to hide photographs and video from people who might use their phone. It looks innocuous, but it’s really a way to keep parents from finding content their children shouldn’t have.

    What parents need to know:

    • It looks like a calculator app – the icon looks like a calculator and will say “Calculator%.” When you open it you’ll see a calculator.
    • Users can enter a passcode into the calculator to get to hidden images and videos. Passcodes begin and end with a period.
    • There are several apps that are similar. If you see a calculator app on your child’s phone, delve into it to be certain that it truly is a calculator app.
      Skout - allows users to arrange a “hook up” with another user

    Why it's popular: This is a flirting app that allows users to sign up as teenagers or adults. They’re placed in their appropriate peer group, where they can post to a feed, comments on others’ posts, add photos and chat.

    What parents need to know:

    • There’s no age verification. A person may sign up as a 15-year-old boy, but it could really be a 45-year-old man preying on teenagers.
    • Users receive notifications when someone “checks” them out, but they must pay “points” to see who it is. Those points aren’t free – they must be purchased via iTunes, Google Checkout, or with a credit card.
    • In 2012, the New York Times published an article about three men being accused of raping children they met through the app.
      Down - allows users to arrange a “hook up” with another user

    Why it's popular: This app, which used to be called “Bang with Friends,” allows users to put their friends into two categories: people they’d like to hang out with or people they’re “down” to hook up with.

    What parents need to know:

    • The first line in the app’s description is: “The secret way to get down with people nearby.”
    • Users are able to say they’d like to “get down” with another user for a hookup. The app then connects users, if they both answer with “get down,” so they can meet in person.
    • This app requires a Facebook account, so information on that account could be exposed to users of this app.

    Why it's popular: This is a flirting app that allows users to sign up as teenagers or adults. They’re placed in their appropriate peer group, where they can post to a feed, comments on others’ posts, add photos and chat.

    What parents need to know:

    • There’s no age verification. A person may sign up as a 15-year-old boy, but it could really be a 45-year-old man preying on teenagers.
    • Users receive notifications when someone “checks” them out, but they must pay “points” to see who it is. Those points aren’t free – they must be purchased via iTunes, Google Checkout, or with a credit card.
    • In 2012, the New York Times published an article about three men being accused of raping children they met through the app.
      Yik Yak - connects users with strangers in their area
      Tumblr - interactive blogging site
      Google+ - a way for people to connect with friends and colleagues
       Oovoo - a free video, voice, and messaging app
       Pheed - a hybrid of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube
       Ask.fm - lets kids ask and answer questions
       Kik Messenger - an app-based alternative to standard texting
       Omegle - an anonymous ways for users to discuss anything
       Whisper - a social "confessional" app
       Secret - lets users voice whatever's on their minds anonymously
       Burn Note - erases messages after a set period of time
       Badoo - connects users with strangers for friendship or dating
       Confide - lets users send messages that will “self-destruct”
       Keek - users post video statuses that can be viewed by strangers
       MeetMe - focuses on meeting, dating strangers
       Poof Texting - users can sent text messages that disappear after they’ve been read
       Streetchat - anonymous way to say or post photos of anything
       Tagged - users connect with strangers; emphasis on dating
       Tinder - matches people with other people around them for friendship or dating
       Viber - lets users make phone calls/send text messages globally
       Wickr - lets users send messages that won’t be archived
     
    Content provided by:
     
    Norwig, Amanda. Social Media 101 "Cyber Safety" HISD. Web. 09/09/2015